Alisha Moore

ALISHA MOORE

Disruptive Designer

Hey there! My name is Alisha and I'm a visual designer on the IBM Cloud team. I’m a native Texan who enjoys films, coffee and tacos (not always together), and growing creatively on a daily basis. I joined Disrupt Diabetes because I'm an advocate for beautiful and meaningful work, with an interest to facilitate social innovation and promote awareness and education to others. Nothing makes me happier than using design thinking, wireframing, user research, and visual design to solve complex problems and craft experiences that impact users.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Insightful, open-minded, creative

Andrew Chou

ANDREW CHOU

Disruptive Designer

I am a clinician-engineer with broad experience in medicine, biodesign, and clinical research and am currently an orthopaedic surgery resident at Singapore General Hospital. I earned my B.S. in biochemical engineering from Stanford University and was awarded a Pitch Johnson Bio-X Fellowship to pursue my research in protein engineering. I later moved to Singapore to earn my M.D. from the Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School and my MRCS from the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, where I was awarded the Seah Cheng Siang Gold Medal in Medicine and the ESCEO-Eli Lilly Healthcare Provider Scholarship. I have published extensively in clinical orthopaedic research journals and have presented my research at meetings for the American Association of Orthopaedic Surgery, Pediatric Orthopedic Society of North America, and the World Congress of Osteoporosis.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Dynamic, empathetic, enthusiastic

Colleen Clark

COLLEEN CLARK

Disruptive Designer

I am an experience design consultant based in Burlington, Vermont and I primarily work at The University of Vermont Medical Center. I took the scenic route to my design career and I bring diverse experiences to my work. During my undergraduate years as an Echols Scholar at the University of Virginia, I integrated my interests by majoring in Public Health and Studio Art, with a minor in Bioethics. After graduation, I completed a post-baccalaureate research fellowship in the Social and Behavioral Research Branch of the National Human Genome Research Institute at the National Institutes of Health. Following the fellowship, I was invited to assist with designing an exhibit that translated the scientific and medical jargon of genomic research into accessible language and interactive experiences at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History. I landed in Vermont to complete requirements for medical school, but soon realized I wanted to focus on innovation and combine my passions for design and healthcare. My recent work has focused on improving the process of the transition of care from pediatric specialty care to adult specialty care. Through this project, I started working with adolescent patients who have T1D and so when I learned about the Disrupt Diabetes initiative I was eager to become involved. I have witnessed the power of design to improve healthcare experiences for patients, families, and providers. I am looking forward to working with a team to truly Disrupt Diabetes! In the fall, I will begin the MDes integrative design program at the University of Michigan.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Enthusiastic, curious, perceptive

Devika Patel

DEVIKA PATEL

Disruptive Designer

Hello! My name is Devika Patel, and I’m the Design Manager at The Better Lab, an academic research center under the auspices of UCSF, located at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital that focuses on using human-centered design to solve challenging healthcare problems for our most vulnerable patients. I’m a Stanford alum, where I studied product design and community health and prevention research. I joined Disrupt Diabetes because 1) I have a deep personal connection to diabetes and have seen the negative effects it can have on one’s quality of life, and 2) I truly believe that human-centered design can be a transformative tool to understand and tackle issues that surround diabetes care for all relevant stakeholders. I’m excited to see what we uncover throughout this process as a team of an advocate and a student, and what we can all learn along the way.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Dedicated, passionate, compassionate

Ei Thazin

EI THAZIN

Disruptive Designer

I'm Ei Thazin and I am currently a senior at Stanford University majoring in Human Biology with a concentration in Designing for Healthcare. I was born in Myanmar and moved to Florida where my family currently resides. I grew up with an interest in preventative health and helping others. At Stanford, I discovered that there were other, big-picture ways to make a change in the healthcare system rather than being a doctor. I was able to intersect my interest in public health with design thinking through classes at the d.school, as well as by teaching my own class on Childhood Nutrition by Design and working up to leading an Alternative Spring Break service trip on the matter. I am also interested in the socioeconomic determinants of health and the influence that built environment has on health outcomes. Disrupt Diabetes is an integration of the issues I care about with the design mindset and ways of thinking. I believe that this could be a model for future patient-centered experiences and it is amazing to be apart of a team that cares about issues related to diabetes, especially as the rate of diagnosis increases.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Persistent, dynamic, imaginative

Jeff Bayer

JEFF BAYER

Disruptive Designer

I am a lead product designer for startups with a personal interest in type 1 diabetes disruption, fitness, and general wellness.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Product design unicorn

Matt Lumpkin

MATT LUMPKIN

Disruptive Designer

Higher Ed & Research-Based Design
My background as a designer is in visual, web, and mobile design in higher education but lately I've been doing a lot of design thinking facilitation with academic researchers in social and developmental psychology. Sometimes that means leading design sprints to validate a problem scope, prototype and user-test solutions. Other times that means diving into the literature of new academic domains and finding my feet so that I can translate the primary research data into designs that are informed by and embody those findings. The work I'm most proud of is an iOS and Android app called CharacterMe designed to build patience, self-control and emotional awareness in teens (research publication forthcoming!)

The Need for Patient-Centered Design with T1D
Since my youngest daughter Hazel's type 1 diabetes diagnosis last year, I've plunged into the hardware, software, human factors problems embedded in the medical technology around diabetes care. Frankly, I find the UX design of most publicly available tools to be very poor. Imagine entering a blood glucose value, often in the hundreds, dozens of times a day using only a tiny rubber rocker switch on a glucose meter with a button that increments in 1's and when held down accelerates so fast that you always overshoot your goal by several hundred.
I have been ranting to anyone who will listen over the past year about the poor UX design in diabetes tech stemming from a lack of patient stakeholder centrality when this design challenge came along aiming to highlight and address just this challenge. I couldn't be more pleased.


OpenAPS
We've had a DIY artificial pancreas system up and running that automates a lot of our routine work and reduces the burden of care (Loopkit on iOS with heavy customization and some Nightscout thrown in for remote monitoring and data mining). I'm proud to be a part of this community, radically re-centering the patient as stakeholder. But every day I see new opportunities to push further into improving our lives and the lives of others like us with the same design-thinking process I use in my work. The more I learn about the complex problem spaces here and the new opportunities presented by ubiquitous computing and more the more excited I am about helping shape the innovation that could genuinely and powerfully impact the lives of people living with these diseases.


Invitation to Conversation
Finally, I'd like to extend an open invitation for anyone in med-tech looking to push the care paradigm forward for the public to a candid, design-literate conversation from a direct user perspective. I'm interested in more than closed-loop systems; I'm talking about recasting the entire problem-space (from diagnosis to complication mitigation and detection) as an experience that could be designed.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Curious, energetic, strategic

Megh Gautam

MEGH GAUTAM

Disruptive Designer

I am an alumnus of the Masters program in Management Science and Engineering at Stanford. I was brought up all over India switching locations on average every 1 and a half years. I got an undergraduate degree in information technology before joining Microsoft for 3 years where I worked on the data and consulting orgs. I have been at companies ranging from 20 to 60,000 and currently wear multiple hats at Hearsay helping financial services market themselves to consumers.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Curious, creative, cackling

Nassir Mokarram

NASSIR MOKARRAM

Disruptive Designer

I am a passionate bioengineer with over ten years of research experience in polymer-based medical devices, neural tissue engineering, and brain tumor therapeutics. The Department of Biomedical Engineering has been my home base for years. I have served the department at Georgia Tech/Emory University as research faculty and more recently, as an assistant research professor at Duke University. Besides academia, I have been involved with the development of medical technologies ranging from endovascular occlusion gel to suprachoroidal drug delivery system. Most recently, I have been leading a clinical translation of a novel nanofiber-based catheter for removing brain tumors. 

I am currently an innovation fellow at Stanford Biodesign. Stanford Biodesign is training world-class innovative people who are reinventing the future of healthcare. This fellowship provides the most in-depth training experience in health technology innovation. All are multidisciplinary experiences that involve hands-on health technology projects with the help of Biodesign faculty and our industry experts.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Passionate, persistent, genuine

Petty Chen

PETTY CHEN

Disruptive Designer

I am a healthcare designer with expertise in medicine, molecular & cellular biology, clinical research, and health economics. I received my B.S. in molecular and cellular biology with a minor in psychology from Duke University, my M.D. from the Duke-National University of Singapore Medical School, and will be starting my MPH at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health this year. Before my current position at Sengkang Health Clinical Governance, I completed my transitional year residency and trained in plastic & reconstructive surgery, breast surgery, obstetrics & gynecology, and orthopedics. Under the mentorship of Professor Tan Kok Hian and Professor Eric Finkelstein, my research thesis on the cost-effectiveness of gestational diabetes mellitus screening redefined the way obstetricians screen expectant mothers in Singapore, as well as won the first inaugural SingHealth Duke-NUS OBGYN ACP 1st poster prize and was presented at the 14th European Congress on Perinatal Medicine in Florence, Italy. My previous health hackathon idea aimed at improving healthcare communications is currently being translated into a unified clinical communications device for the upcoming Sengkang General Hospital to help optimize communications between physicians, nurses, and allied health staff.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Creative, big-picture oriented, analytical

Rob Lister

ROB LISTER

Disruptive Designer

I am a designer of healthcare experiences and co-founder of Future Medical Systems, a consultancy providing service and product design for clients ranging from large healthcare systems to cutting-edge medtech start-ups. With more than 20 years experience in health care innovation (including leading the Medical Products group at IDEO), I have brought new concepts to life with clients including Eli Lilly, Stanford Health Care, and Edwards Lifesciences. When not thinking about health, I have been the director of a circus group and once threw a completed pass at the Cowboys Stadium in Dallas.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Let’s design healthcare

Robert Pugliese

ROBERT PUGLIESE

Disruptive Designer

I am Associate Director of JeffDESIGN at the Sidney Kimmel Medical College and Founding Director of the Health Design Lab @JeffInnovation. This first-of-its-kind program and space supports a multidisciplinary approach to solving public healthcare and public health challenges and provides design thinking focused interdisciplinary education to medical students and other healthcare professionals. A practicing Emergency Medicine Clinical Pharmacist and Clinical Assistant Professor at Thomas Jefferson University and Hospital, I have over 10 years of experience in the clinical and operational aspects of healthcare delivery in the urban environment. As a Type 1 Diabetic, I take a personal interest in providing education and advocating for the significant diabetic population I encounter in my daily work.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Curious, creative, geeky

Shanaz Rauff

SHANAZ RAUFF

Disruptive Designer

Hi, I'm Shanaz, a Stanford Global Biodesign Fellow with a professional background in healthcare investments and an academic background in bioengineering and finance from the University of Pennsylvania. The clinical focus for the fellowship this year is endocrinology, and one of the biggest problems is the accelerating imbalance between the diabetes burden and healthcare resources to manage it. I'm looking forward to developing more insights here that can translate to solutions with impact in both developed and developing markets around the world.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Thoughtful, practical, international

Bill Sheppard

BILL SHEPPARD

PATIENT POWERHOUSE

I'm a relative newcomer to Type I diabetes, having been diagnosed about five years ago (firmly into middle age). I've leveraged my passion for technology to find effective ways to help manage my diabetes, and am optimistic that treatments and tools will continue to rapidly improve. Professionally I'm a technology consultant, currently serving as GM, Innovation Ecosystem at ADT Security, where I foster relationships with startups, VC’s, accelerators, and other technology partners to help guide ADT’s strategy and roadmap in the smart home and security markets. Prior to joining ADT I spent fifteen years with Sun Microsystems (since acquired by Oracle) working with cable operators, movie studios, and others to envision and launch a Java-based digital television platform which can be found in hundreds of millions of set-top boxes, game consoles, and Blu-ray Disc players. I hold a B.S. in Computer Engineering from Iowa State University and am also an active angel investor, Emmy voter, and semi-accomplished trombonist. I live in Los Altos with my wife, daughters Shira (8th grade) and Ariella (5th grade), and beloved dog Biscuit.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Curious, insightful, optimistic

Bob Durstenfeld

BOB DURSTENFELD

PATIENT POWERHOUSE

Welcome!  I’m Bob Durstenfeld, I have had Type 1 Diabetes for more than 60 years. I studied Biology and Electrical Engineering as an Undergraduate and International Marketing and Engineering Management as a Graduate Student. I have worked in tech for more than thirty years doing Test Engineering, Marketing, Brand Management, Public Relations, Investor Relations and Analyst Relations.  I am married and have three sons, my oldest has Type 1 Diabetes too.  Diabetes has not slowed me down. I have traveled to 22 countries, some for business, most for pleasure. I am an avid hiker and photographer. I am excited to participate in Disrupt Diabetes because change has come too slowly and I think that the emotional load and the decision exhaustion parts of managing diabetes are not adequately dealt with.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Type 1 diabetes, world traveler, technology marketer

Emily Zhen

EMILY ZHEN

PATIENT POWERHOUSE

Hi! My name is Emily, I’m a junior in high school from the East Bay, and I’m a proud ESFJ. My hobbies include running and traveling, and I aspire to be a surgical physician’s assistant in the future. I joined Disrupt Diabetes as a patient because technology has never truly alleviated a diabetic routine for me, and I’m interested and excited to implement my ideas to help alleviate the problems that I face every day. Additionally, I’m here because I’m deeply curious about the process behind medical innovations and ideas, and I’m here to experience said process for myself.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Driven, amiable, witty

Mabelle Pasmooij

MABELLE PASMOOIJ

PATIENT POWERHOUSE

Hello! I’m Mabelle Pasmooij. I am currently a sophomore at Castilleja High School in Palo Alto California. Outside of school, I love to read, play tennis, and paint pictures for my family. The past three summers, I volunteered at the San Jose Day camp, a camp for kids with Type One Diabetes in San Jose. I have had Type One Diabetes for two and a half years and I am so excited to be apart of Disrupt Diabetes. I joined Disrupt Diabetes because I am passionate about helping others with this condition, and I hope to help create something that can positively impact their lives. I am looking forward to work with my team to make our ideas into reality.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Hardworking, passionate, optimistic

Megan Runyon

MEGAN RUNYON

PATIENT POWERHOUSE

Hello! My name is Megan and I am a Patient Powerhouse for this year’s Disrupt Diabetes Challenge. I have had Type One Diabetes for 14 years now and strive to live life with the passion to push limits and not let diabetes limit what’s possible. I am originally from the Bay Area and love being outdoors and being active. I grew up sailing, playing sports (i.e. soccer, basketball, lacrosse, gymnastics), hiking, camping and am always looking for the next adventure. For the last three and a half years I was working and living aboard privately owned yachts, which took me to places I had never imagined and allowed me to see the world through a very unique lens. Most importantly, it challenged me to be self-reliant and confident in a lot of different ways, which helped me grow as a person. It pushed me to have to think in unique ways being as I wasn’t always in a conventional setting. I have learned, and still am learning, how to think beyond diabetes in order to live a life that is both fulfilling and hopefully inspiring.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Empathetic, funny, compassionate

Michael Frush

MICHAEL FRUSH

PATIENT POWERHOUSE

Hello there! It’s nice to meet you! I’m Michael Frush, a young designer and aspiring architect. I consider myself a weird spatially extended cyborg with my data body running rampant around the globe while my meat body resides in Atlanta, Georgia. I have been living with Type One Diabetes since April 2016. I was diagnosed as a young adult while attending graduate school at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Living with T1D has allowed me to embrace the “weirdness” of my body and re-evaluate the important aspects of life. I’m passionate about the Diabetes Community and I joined Disrupt Diabetes to place myself in a more active role within the community to attempt to help bridge the gaps that exist among patient experiences, research and medicine. Through a creative collaboration it is possible to change the perception of diabetes and embrace the “weirdness” of the condition at a larger scale. I’m very excited to see what Disrupt Diabetes will help do for the Diabetes Community and the patient community at-large!

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Weird, outgoing, enthusiastic

Narendra Nayak

NARENDRA NAYAK

PATIENT POWERHOUSE

I’ve lived a long time with diabetes, faced many challenges, and overcome quite a few. Over the years there’s been a steady improvement in the ways to manage diabetes, and I’ve benefited from all those advances. But, there’s a lot more that can be done to improve the quality of life for those living with this condition. I liked what I heard about the goals Disrupt Diabetes has, and am eager to contribute towards this initiative by sharing my experiences, hoping that they will help others who live with diabetes every day. I also hope to gain from the experiences other patients have had in managing their diabetes.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Fun-loving, outgoing, motivated

Natalie Tove

NATALIE TOVE

PATIENT POWERHOUSE

Hi, I am Natalie Johnson. I am a mother, wife, and currently a nurse at Stanford Health Care. I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in the winter of 1998 at the age of 17. I currently manage my diabetes with an insulin pump and a continuous glucose monitor. I grew up in the central valley of California and graduated with my nursing degree from Fresno State. I worked at a level 1-trauma center in Fresno for 2 years and 10 years ago I accepted a position at Stanford and have been there ever since. I have also been a clinical instructor in the nursing program at UCSF. Recently, I became a mother to a beautiful little boy, who keeps me on my toes. I joined Disrupt Diabetes because I believe I can be a strong voice on behalf of the millions of people that live with diabetes. I am so inspired by the people that have put this program together. The opportunity to help push innovation forward, I couldn’t let pass by.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Advocate, loyal, honest

Paul Fernandes

PAUL FERNANDES

PATIENT POWERHOUSE

Greetings! I am Paul Fernandes, a long-time engineer and team leader in the medical device and bio-technology fields. I originated in the Iberian Peninsula and have spent most of my life in the Boston area, professionally and academically. I am an avid soccer player and love to participate in just about any outdoor activity that promotes fun and health for body and mind. I joined Disrupt Diabetes because I experience diabetes every day, on a personal level, and recognize the difficulties and lack of effective solutions to manage this condition. I am extremely excited to collaborate with a team that shares this passion and look forward to seeing and learning from the other teams participating in this endeavor.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Explorer, witty, grateful

Rajan Jobanputra

RAJAN JOBANPUTRA

PATIENT POWERHOUSE

Hello, my name is Rajan Jobanputra. I am a freshman at San Jose State University majoring in Kinesiology and a concentration in Athletic Training. I have been a diabetic for 9 years now and have had my fair share of struggles and problems with diabetes. In school, I am involved in club volleyball, Akbayan Cultural Club, Spartan Shops, and Kinesiology Ambassadors Club. I joined Disrupt Diabetes because it seemed like the perfect opportunity to give a patient’s outlook on the disease and how certain things can make life easier for diabetics. I have high hopes for all the teams that are participating in Disrupt Diabetes and can’t wait to see the final products!

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Enthusiastic, talkative, resilient

Srihari Yamanoor

SRIHARI YAMANOOR

PATIENT POWERHOUSE

Hello, this is Srihari Yamanoor, a Stanford Mechanical Engineering alum from India, living in the Bay Area, not too far from campus. I work in medical device design and I am also interested in other areas of healthcare. My brother and I deeply collaborate in designing systems that promote more physical activity engagement among pre-diabetics, diabetics and people with weight control issues. We display this at events of public interest, including Maker Faires and scientific conferences. I joined Disrupt Diabetes because I am passionate about helping out in anyway in the battle against diabetes. There is some selfishness to this, as my family has history of diabetes incidence and I myself am a prediabetic.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Engaged, passionate, entrepreneurial

Terry Jackson

TERRY JACKSON

PATIENT POWERHOUSE

I live and work in the Philadelphia area. I have been a diabetic for 32 years and insulin-dependent for 31 years.  Although mistakenly diagnosed as Type 2, I later learned that I was a LADA (latent autoimmune diabetes in adults) Type 1.  After more than 25 years on multiple daily injections, I transitioned to the OmniPod insulin pump (LOVE IT!), and later to the Dexcom continuous glucose monitor (CGM).  The Disrupt Diabetes project resonates deeply with my belief that education and knowledge are transformative!


My professional career in the past 17 years has been in higher education, specifically in graduate program administration.  Prior to my work in higher education, my career was in the organizational psychology and managed behavioral health field and as a management and training consultant. I believe that education is transformative, and am committed to my own, and others’, lifelong learning. I hold two Master’s degrees and, this summer, I will complete my dissertation defense to earn my Ed.D. from the George Washington University’s executive leadership program in human and organizational learning. My areas of research interest include shared and collaborative leadership, teaming, and teamwork.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Intuitive, hopeful, Lebowski fan

Zoe Heineman

ZOE HEINEMAN

PATIENT POWERHOUSE

My name is Zoe Heineman. I am participating in the 2018 Disrupt Diabetes Design Challenge as a person with diabetes. I live in Edison, NJ since 2017 with my husband Alex. Both of our families are from Maryland and we met in 2014 while living in New York City. I am the US Head of Commercial Operations for Thrombogenics, Inc., a biotech company whose mission is to develop treatments to address unmet needs in diabetic eye disorders.

You could say I have been trying to get rid of diabetes or at least minimize its impact on my life since I was diagnosed in 1990 (when I was 24), while attending graduate school at Johns Hopkins University and also working at a summer camp in Baltimore. My mom diagnosed me over the phone when I told her I was drinking water and peeing simultaneously whenever I could take a break at work. I was losing weight while eating more than ever. Mom knew the symptoms for diabetes and made me promise to go see a doctor the next day. My BG was off the charts high. Due to the fact that diabetes supplies like syringes and test strips were not covered by insurance in Maryland at the time, I quickly became an advocate for better access to care and coverage. I went to work for the coalition that testified in the Maryland state house for a mandate to cover diabetes and to cover pre-existing conditions. And we succeeded. What I learned from that advocacy experience was that elected officials can become insulated from the reality of their individual constituents. They need to hear from you to make the best decisions. I soon became inspired to leave teaching for diabetes work. Since 1993  I've worked for several companies in the diabetes industry and consulted to many emerging diabetes technology companies as a consultant.

My proudest accomplishment is the leadership role I played in changing Medicare policy to add new coverage for insulin pumps and supplies. Prior to that,  people using pumps lost their insurance coverage for pump therapy as soon as they became Medicare beneficiaries. As soon as Medicare started covering insulin pump therapy, other health plans followed their example. That change came about largely as a result of a letter-writing campaign from patients, caregivers, diabetes educators and endocrinologists to members of the US House of Representatives and Senate, along with industry efforts to document the need and health economic benefits.

To be candid, after 28 years of type 1, diabetes management doesn’t get any easier. In some ways it gets harder, like feeling symptoms of low blood glucose, a.k.a. hypoglycemia, which can happen randomly and unpredictably. I constantly live in fear of hypoglycemia and am grateful for my CGM waking me up during sleep when I am below the safe range. In 2014 I started a public awareness education initiative to train first responders to recognize and respond to the symptoms of severe hypoglycemia,  "Hypoglycemia Awareness"  also known as "Ha!"™. Through it I encourage people with diabetes to show their friends and co-workers where they keep and carry Glucagon, glucose gels or tablets and other sources of glucose. Ask me to "show you my G" when we meet.

Through diabetes I have learned much more than I ever would have without it. I have made a positive difference to millions of people with diabetes and their families. I've become more determined to accomplish goals on both a professional as well as a personal basis. I have completed four New York City marathons since 2013. Last year I started the challenge of Triathlons and completed my second one on March 18 indoors at Chelsea Piers in NYC. Currently I am training for the Paris marathon on April 8.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Wise, loyal, caring

Amanda Tu

AMANDA TU

STUDENT LEAD

I am a sophomore from Louisville, Kentucky studying Product Design and Creative Writing. With my experience interning at a healthcare startup accelerator, working for an early stage medical device company, and directing a suite of health innovation events on Stanford’s campus, I’ve long been passionate about the rich intersection between design and healthcare. I was initially drawn to Disrupt Diabetes by my family’s extensive history with the illness—witnessing my relatives’ lifelong journeys with their conditions inspired me to seek out innovative solutions in the diabetes management space. Outside of Disrupt Diabetes, I serve as Vice President of Marketing for BASES, Stanford’s largest student entrepreneurship association.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Resilient, flexible, and funny

Chloe Harris

CHLOE HARRIS

STUDENT LEAD

Hello! I’m Chloe Harris, a freshman at Stanford University from Los Angeles. While I am currently undeclared, I plan on pursuing a major in Human Biology with a prospective minor in Human Rights. I am deeply passionate about the intersection of medicine and social justice, as I believe that access to quality medical care is a social right and not a privilege. On campus, I work as a lab assistant at the Cardinal Free Clinics, I tutor children from the Ravenswood school district in East Palo Alto, and I am a member of ITALIC—an arts-centric residential learning program that integrates art theory with art practice. I am beyond excited to a be a part of Disrupt Diabetes given that I strongly believe that patients should lead the effort to pioneer solutions to their unmet health needs. I look forward to this journey as both a humbling learning opportunity and an enriching introduction to diabetes research!

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Outgoing, empathetic, persistent

Christine Yang

CHRISTINE YANG

STUDENT LEAD

Hi! I'm Christine, a freshman at Stanford from New York City! I'm planning on majoring in Bioengineering, and I'm involved in Stanford Students in Biodesign, Cardinal Free Clinics, and Stanford Women in Engineering. I joined Disrupt Diabetes because I am interested in patient-driven innovation and biodesign.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Persistent, loyal, straightforward

Courtney Gao

COURTNEY GAO

STUDENT LEAD

Hi! My name is Courtney Gao, I'm a sophomore at Stanford from Piedmont, CA studying Human Biology. I work as a research assistant with the Feldman Lab in Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics, using clinical and neural imaging data to better understand the predictors of language and learning outcomes of premature infants. I sing as a soprano in Stanford Chamber Chorale, and I'm a part of Stanford Team HBV (Hepatitis B Virus) and Alpha Phi. I joined Disrupt Diabetes because I want to collaborate with patients and design thinkers to serve those affected by diabetes in an innovative way. I most look forward to learning from my teammates as well as other diabetes patients, and applying this knowledge to meeting the needs they face.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Empathetic, thoughtful communicator

Daniel Chen

DANIEL CHEN

STUDENT LEAD

Hi! I’m Daniel Chen, a freshman at Stanford from Maryland. As of now, I’m undeclared, but I’m planning to major in Symbolic Systems or Psychology. On campus, I’m involved in SHIFT, a healthcare and tech club. I joined Disrupt Diabetes because I really want to understand patient's needs and do my best to support them using my technical skills. I am so excited to help Disrupt Diabetes become a reality, and I can’t wait to see how the next four weeks will unfold.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Always more learning

Eyad Alrabbat

EYAD ALRABBAT

STUDENT LEAD

Hi, I’m Eyad Alrabbat, and I’m a junior from the University of Texas at Dallas majoring in Neuroscience. As a pre-med, I’m aware of the high prevalence of diabetes in the community and was curious to learn more about it through Disrupt Diabetes, especially because of the unique inclusion of a patient in the design process. I wanted to really know what life was like for those with diabetes, so that I could fully understand the consequences of diabetes, and the areas for improvement. I enjoy design runs and group projects, and was attracted to the opportunity to create something that benefits others.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Curious, capable, thoughtful

Geetanjali Rajamani.jpg

GEETANJALI RAJAMANI

STUDENT LEAD

Hello! My name is Geeta Rajamani, and I’m a freshman at Stanford University. I’m originally from Saint Paul, Minnesota. I am a pre-med student interested in studying Human Biology, and potentially minoring in psychology. Aside from my passion for medicine, I have a love for dance, and am part of Basmati Raas, a nationally competitive Indian dance team. I am also involved in Stanford Women in Medicine (SWIM). One of the main reasons I’m eager to be a part of Disrupt Diabetes is my deep empathy for patients with diabetes – I’ve grown up watching many close family members suffer through daily injections and other lifestyle constraints, and I want to do everything in my power to alleviate their suffering. I am so excited and honored for this opportunity!

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Passionate, thoughtful, driven

Gitanjali Multani

GITANJALI MULTANI

STUDENT LEAD

Hello! I’m Gitanjali Multani, a freshman at Stanford from sunny San Diego, California. I aspire to major in Biomechanical Engineering and minor in Creative Writing, but we will see where Stanford takes me. On campus, I am involved in Dil Se, the Biomedical Engineering Society, Intersect Magazine, and Topiary Literary Magazine. Disrupt diabetes offers a doorway into the healthcare community at Stanford, and I am eager to delve into the creation of novel, fast, and sensitive medical devices that have the potential to significantly improve quality of life. I am looking forward to May 20th and witnessing the wonderful power of patient-driven innovation.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Respectful, curious, motivated

Ilham Osman

ILHAM OSMAN

STUDENT LEAD

Hi!! I’m Ilham Osman, a freshman at Stanford from Michigan. I’m planning to major in Biomedical computation. On campus I’m involved in the East Palo Alto Tutoring and Tennis program, the BioX program, and Dengue & Zika virus research at the Stanford medical school. I joined disrupt diabetes because much of my family suffers from diabetes and I have witnessed the struggles of it firsthand. Through this program I hope to aid in finding solutions to those who live with this daily struggle. I am so excited to be a part of a program that combines two things I am passionate about: medicine and helping others.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Passionate, kind, enthusiastic

Priyanka Multani

PRIYANKA MULTANI

STUDENT LEAD

Hello! I am Priyanka Multani, a freshman at Stanford from San Diego, California. I am currently undeclared but am planning to major in Biomechanical Engineering and minor in Psychology. On campus, I am involved in the Biomedical Engineering Society, Stanford Intersect Journal, and Dil Se. I joined Disrupt Diabetes because it offers the distinct privilege of collaborating first-hand with patients in order to identify the most prevalent needs within the diabetes community. In addition, Disrupt Diabetes aligns well with my passion for medicine, my drive for innovation, and my love for collaboration. I am so thrilled to be a part of Disrupt diabetes and look forward to being truly inspired by the incredible ideas that each team comes up with.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Optimistic, curious, light-hearted

Rachael Xiong

RACHAEL XIONG

STUDENT LEAD

Hello, my name is Rachael Xiong, and I am a sweet Georgia Peach. This is my first year at Stanford, so I am still exploring the many avenues and opportunities that I have access to. Currently, I am thinking about pursuing a major in Public Policy with a concentration in Health Policy or Human Biology with a concentration in Ethics and Medical Humanities. Beyond my academics, I am involved in the Hmong Student Union, East Palo Alto Tennis and Tutoring, and the Stanford Daily. The predominant reason why I joined Disrupt Diabetes is because I want to become a member of a team that revolutionizes medicine by addressing issues in a patient-centric manner. I look forward to working actively as a member of my team and seeing the advancements Disrupt Diabetes will bring.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Bubbly, warmhearted, attentive

Raga Ayyagari

RAGA AYYAGARI

STUDENT LEAD

I am a master’s student in the Epidemiology and Clinical Research Program who is interested in addressing the social and environmental determinants of health through research, policy, and community partnerships. I completed my BS in Human Biology and minor in Environmental Systems Engineering at Stanford, where I studied the intersection of epidemiology and environmental engineering through water and air quality projects in South Africa, Peru, Nicaragua, and Bangladesh. Translating my experience in global health to addressing domestic health disparities, I contributed to a project assessing neighborhood level public health informatics programs through the Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences. Driven by the stories of family members and friends who live with diabetes, I joined Disrupt Diabetes because I am passionate about diabetes prevention and am interested in learning more about patient advocacy and design. I am excited to learn from and contribute to an interdisciplinary team of patients, students, designers, and health professionals through this experience.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Compassionate, curious, creative

Yan Yan

YAN YAN

STUDENT LEAD

Hi! I'm Yan, a senior studying product design and food systems originally from the Pacific Northwest. I joined Disrupt Diabetes to better understand the patient perspective and consider how the built environment influences eating and nutritional habits of those managing diabetes.

What are three words you would use to describe yourself?

Apricot, fennel, tamarind